Gas tank location

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Gas tank location

Postby charles » Sun Mar 14, 2010 2:57 pm

Having never had a stove plumbed in my 38T, I was wondering where to put the tank? My friends tank is in the deck box which would require a long tube laying project. What about in the quarter berth behind the nav station? Maybe in the bottom of the deep storage locker to the left of where the stove will go? Looking for pros, cons, safety issues, ease of getting out for refill, ease of install and not taking up too much usable space. thnx

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Postby mike » Mon Mar 15, 2010 7:44 pm

Charles,

No gas tanks should be stowed within the confines of the boat its self, the deck box although a good distance away is a safe place to have the tank, the locker must also be self draining from a gas point of view so that any leak will vent over the side (which it will on the open deck), if you take a pipe out through the bottom of the box into the boat there must be an upstand pipe that is sealed to the bottom of the box; say 2"-3" high round the pipe & the drain hole for the box in a lower position so that if there is a gas leak it will vent rather than go down into the boat. For safety there should be no joints inside the boat except at the end where a separate gas isolation tap should be fitted. The pipe should not be run on top of a stringer as it can allow condensation/water to collect & promote corrosion.

On JS we have an electric valve at the tank end which we turn off each time we are not using the gas which makes good sense. Like us you'd also be well advised to fit a gas detector as gas explosions are not a pretty sight!

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Postby clonjers » Tue Mar 16, 2010 5:51 pm

about 20 years ago we painted aluminum tanks and stored them in the open on the stern pulpit. So far they are still fine, except for the one that was stolen.

Have many sea-miles on them as well.

Can't refill now as they don't meet the newer standards for tanks.
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talk about risk

Postby dolphins » Wed Mar 17, 2010 1:13 am

Wow, I have read a few stories about explosions on board, and therefore i wouldn't want to risk having them anywhere inboard.

That said, on the the 33T, there is a built-in lazarette for propane tanks in the cockpit. I suppose if one of them leaked and exploded there, it would rip a hole in the boat as well. But at least it would be pretty far aft.

I like the idea of externally mounted cabinet in the last post.

-Mathias
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Postby mike » Wed Mar 17, 2010 11:48 am

Mathias,

Providing the stowage in the lazerette is COMPLETELY gas tight to the rest of the boat with seals round the out going gas pipe & that it has a drain from its lowest point overboard then there should be no problem.

The problem with having a gas locker inboard is keeping it gas tight so that any leaking gas cannot go into the bilges.

I was working as one of the skippers last summer on one of the ex round the world 72ft challenge yachts up in the artic circle so we were at times more than 600 miles from help. We were so concerned about gas that at the end of each 3 hour watch we had to give the bilge pump minimum of 40 strokes to ensure the bilges were empty of any gas the detectors may not have detected. All deoderants were also banned, they usually have gas propellants, if you think of a crew of 17 each using a spray can daily you could soon get a good build up of potentially explosive butane in the bilges!


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Postby mimoza » Thu Mar 18, 2010 5:59 am

That's why stick deodorants were invented.
I wonder if the failure to use deodorants resulted in the production of any flammable gases....

w.r.t. to propane locker on the 33: it is correctly designed, but it is prudent to periodically check the drain on it to be sure that it drains well and especially that the through hull fitting is sound and not corroded closed.
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Postby mike » Thu Mar 18, 2010 10:09 am

Bri

17 crew x 3 weeks in confined quarters = not very good air con!

Mike
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Postby rick_bradshaw » Thu Mar 18, 2010 10:06 pm

Mathias,

I think you will find that the LPG compartment is plumbed via a copper pipe into a cockpit scupper where the hose goes down toward the sea and not back into the boat. LPG is heavier than air and will go out of the boat that way. The cockpit access should be cleaned well. We've spent so much time in or near boat yards that we find it accumulates dust under that lid quite easily and quickly.

If properly vented, the 33T installation is good.
Rick

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